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Tag Archives: france

Dordogne, FranceDordogne is a department in southwestern France, with its prefecture in Périgueux. The department is located in the region of Aquitaine between the Loire Valley and the Pyrenees. and is named after the great Dordogne river that runs through it. It roughly corresponds with the ancient county of Périgord.

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5Caen, France  (by Edgard.V)Caen is a commune in northwestern France. It is the prefecture of the Calvados department and the capital of the Basse-Normandie region.It is also the second largest municipality in all of Normandy after Le Havre and the third largest city proper in Normandy, after Rouen and Le Havre. The metropolitan area of Caen, in turn, is the second largest in Normandy after that of Rouen, the 21st largest in France.It is located 15 km  inland from the English Channel, two hours north-west of Paris, and connected to the south of England by the Caen-(Ouistreham)-Portsmouth ferry route. Caen is located in the centre of its northern region, and it is a centre of political, economic and cultural power. Located a few miles from the coast, the landing beaches, the bustling resort of Deauville and Cabourg, Norman Switzerland or Pays d’Auge, Caen is often considered the archetype of Normandy.

Photo by Edgard.V


Rouen, FranceRouen, in north-western France on the River Seine, is the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) region and the historic capital city of Normandy. Once one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, it was the seat of the Exchequer of Normandy in the Middle Ages. It was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties, which ruled both England and large parts of modern France from the 11th to the 15th centuries. It was here that Joan of Arc was executed in 1431. People from Rouen are called Rouennais.


23Fontaine des Eléphants in Chambéry, Savoie, FranceThe Fontaine des Éléphants (“Elephants Fountain”) is the most famous landmark in Chambéry. It was built in 1838 to honour Benoît de Boigne’s feats when he was in India. The monumental fountain has strikingly realistic sculptures of the head and forelimbs of four lifesize elephants truncated into the base of a tall column in the shape of the savoyan (savoyarde) cross, topped by a statue of de Boigne. At first, the landmark was mocked by the local residents who were annoyed by it, but it now is accepted as one of the city’s symbols. Since the early controversy, the statue kept its nickname of les quatre sans culs, (“the four without arses”, which sounds in French similar to the title of the best-known movie by nouvelle vague director François Truffaut: Les quatre cents coups, “The 400 Blows”).


Pont Alexandre III, Paris, FranceThe Pont Alexandre III is an arch bridge that spans the Seine, connecting the Champs-Élysées quarter and the Invalides and Eiffel Tower quarter, widely regarded as the most ornate, extravagant bridge in Paris.The bridge, with its exuberant Art Nouveau lamps, cherubs, nymphs and winged horses at either end, was built between 1896 and 1900. It is named after Tsar Alexander III, who had concluded the Franco-Russian Alliance in 1892. His son Nicholas II laid the foundation stone in October 1896. The style of the bridge reflects that of the Grand Palais, to which it leads on the right bank.The construction of the bridge is a marvel of 19th century engineering, consisting of a six-metre high single span steel arch. The design, by the architects Joseph Cassien-Bernard and Gaston Cousin, was subject to strict controls that prevented the bridge from obscuring the view of the Champs-Élysées or the Invalides.The bridge was built by the engineers Jean Résal and Amédée d’Alby and inaugurated in 1900 for the Universal Exhibition (as were the nearby Grand Palais and Petit Palais).



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