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Arhive pe etichete: art

2d-portraits-painted-onto-human-faces-12D or not 2D is the second collaboration between photographer Alexander Khokhlov and make-up artist Valeriya Kutsan. This time around, the team was increased to include Veronica Ershova who led the process of retouching and post-production.The authors were inspired by two-dimensional posters and the goal was to turn the models faces into two dimensional-like images. Valeriya used an array of painting styles, from sketch and graphic arts to watercolour and oil-painting.
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Sarah-Illenberger-Food-Art-1It’s not uncommon to be wandering through the food market and see a face staring back at you from the fruit bin. There in the bottom of a lemon is a perfectly formed smile, complete with dimples for eyes and a crease for the lips. Sarah Illenberger’s daily experience is a lot like that, only she’s been seeing rainbows, diamonds and disco balls in her food.
Sarah-Illenberger-Food-Art-2The Munich born, multi-disciplinary designer has made a name for herself by re-imagining familiar objects and creating witty new interpretations that broaden our perspectives. Her series Tutti Frutti began during a stroll through food markets in Tuscany, Italy. Wandering past the rows of colorful food, she grabbed fruit and vegetables, transforming them into everything from pome-grenades to Rubix-fruits – in each case creating something surprisingly clever, yet simple.
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JanHuling1New York artist Jan Huling takes common objects, such as dolls, toys or statues, and meticulously transforms them with vibrant patterns of beads. This process completely alters the original object, making even highly recognizable figures seem unfamiliar when stripped down to their most basic structure.JanHuling3Huling explains, “In each of my constructions, surface design is the key component. Czech seed beads adorn objects in colorful patterns, camouflaging their original circumstance, allowing us to see them as pure form without their usual connotations. The process is slow and meticulous, zen-like, with the choice of forms motivating color schemes and iconography.”JanHuling5

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ChristopherDavidWhite1Christopher David White is an American artist that creates hyperrealistic sculptures that explore themes of growth and decay. Many of his sculptures are made from ceramic, further brought to life with acrylic paint. In his artist statement, White explains:
ChristopherDavidWhite2With nature undergoing a perpetual transformation, everything derived from nature is subject to the same repetitive cycle of growth and decay—of life and death. Change is a constant reminder that permanence is the ultimate illusion. It is through the creation of hyper-realistic sculpture that I explore the relationship between nature, man, and the phenomenon of impermanence. I seek to expose the beauty that often results from decay while, at the same time, making my viewer question their own perception of the world around them.
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Replaceface2Replaceface is an ongoing series of portraits where modern celebrities are transported back in time into the role of 19th-century Russian generals. As we have seen before, artist Steve Payne is behind the clever compositions that redefine the idea of a classic painting.Using digital copies of English portrait artist George Dawe’s work, Payne meticulously matches the brushstrokes, colors, and style to create a realistic composition that blends old and new elements. He maintains the regal postures of the subjects and adds an ornate gold frame to suggest authenticity of the digital manipulations.
Replaceface4The strength and pride of each military figure emanates from the classic pieces and viewers may quickly forget that the works weren’t actually created in the 19th-century. The realistic results are thanks to Payne’s creative eye and his impressive technical skills. The project allows Payne to have fun with Photoshop and he says, „I was always drawn to the fun side of image manipulation, the kind of stuff you can do using photos of your friends.”

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YoonjinLeeLittleLostProject1Most pedestrians simply walk past the used, abandoned, and broken things found along the streets of New York City. But, not graphic designer Yoonjin Lee! As she navigates through the city, the senior at the School of Visual Arts finds clever ways to give personality to a variety of small, inanimate objects in her series, Little Lost Project.

YoonjinLeeLittleLostProject2The artist constructs tiny cardboard signs that create a voice for the discarded stuff and convey messages like „Help! I’m lost!” and „You’d think a ‘pair of gloves’ would be together forever…I am useless now.” The poor little objects hold the signs up along the sidewalks and, if passers-by happen to take a second glance, they will discover the sadness a lost lighter or a dropped metro card might „feel” when it discovers it no longer has a purpose.

YoonjinLeeLittleLostProject3The artist explains, „Losing your phone can ruin your day for sure but how about losing your favorite lip balm that you always keep in your pocket? It is definitely annoying but you can easily buy a new one. Ever wonder where and what these little objects are doing now?”

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Brad-Spencer-Book-Sculptures-1When you think of bricks, you’re probably thinking of LEGOs or house building materials, but probably not a medium for making sculptures. Brad Spencer is setting the record straight, using the red earthen blocks to create sculptures in a method he says dates back to the ancient Babylonians. The use of this common building material makes his pieces highly unusual, while the results play tricks with the eyes.
Brad-Spencer-Book-Sculptures-2Each example has the signature brick and mortar lines running through them, giving each piece the bizarre appearance of being one solid block overlaid with brick texture. Many people try to figure out the method behind Brad’s work, and are surprised to find that he carves each of his sculptures from individual bricks before assembling them. You can find more of his very different work on his personal website.
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KevinCorradoTransfer1Artist Kevin Corrado plays with all kinds of perspectives in this visually intriguing series titled Transfer. In each scene, a single arm, attached to nothing, hangs mysteriously down from the sky. The entire hand, covered with dripping paint to match the surrounding landscape, blends together with the scene in a dramatic combination of real and surreal.
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Corrado digitally composes the images to create the unusual moments suspended high above the world. One piece, Transfer White, is actually a blend of half photograph and half painting. The artist strives to create neutral places that are indistinct, stating that „it’s more fun for a viewer to connect with a general idea of a location, such as nature, rather than a specific location somewhere.”

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SusanStockwell1Sail Away is an ever expanding, large scale installation comprised of hundreds of small boats made from paper money, tickets and maps from all over the world. The artist Susan Stockwell encourages visitors to engage and contribute by making their own ships to add to the collection. Stockwell crafted the small boats by hand, folding and sewing global currency to form the hulls, masts, and sails of the miniature flotilla. The masts themselves are made of a variety of simple objects, such as knitting needles, skewer sticks, and paintbrushes.

SusanStockwell2Stockwell is interested in exploring the ideas of international connectivity through travel and trade, global exchange and the personal and social history derived from these contacts. She uses the single unifier of paper currency to represent the unknown links we have with one another. Each type of currency has its own conceived history, cultural significance, and responsibility to its country of origin and each individual bill creates a connection to the people who have already handled it in the far corners of the world.

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modernrenaissance1Expert Photoshoppers over at Worth1000 continue to re-imagine classic paintings with celebrities as the models. The skilled photo manipulators have been expanding the site’s Modern Renaissance collection with their creative additions, transforming the likes of superstars like Julia Roberts and Jack Nicholson into painted people from centuries past.
modernrenaissance2The cleverly humorous amalgamations disregard any notion of time or aging as they spotlight these present-day celebrities as classically painted portraits. They take famed actors off the big screen, legendary athletes off the courts, and iconic musicians off the stage and, instead, throw their images onto canvases. Some of these „paintings” are so well doctored and incredibly believable, it’s hard to tell that a celebrity’s face has just been edited in.
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