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Arhive pe etichete: photography

high-speed-water-drop-photography-by-markus-reugels-1There are entire worlds out there that humans cannot see with the naked eye. With powerful microscopes we are able to observe life at the microscopic (and even atomic) level; and with high-speed cameras we are able to observe events that happen in fractions of a second.Photographer Markus Reugels focuses on the latter, primarily experimenting with water drops. Through dizzying combinations of lighting, food colouring, surfaces (liquid and solid) and airstreams; Reugels creates incredible liquid art that occurs and disappears in a split-second, but is immortalized through his photography.
high-speed-water-drop-photography-by-markus-reugels-2Reguels stresses the fact that the images are not Photoshopped and that he only uses post-production software to remove things like sensor dust. All tones and colours are naturally processed and the shapes and patterns are not digitally manipulated.At the end of the gallery I’ve included some slow-motion video to show how some of the shots are achieved along with an informative video interview with Reugels that delves deeper into his process and set up.
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Sarah-Illenberger-Food-Art-1It’s not uncommon to be wandering through the food market and see a face staring back at you from the fruit bin. There in the bottom of a lemon is a perfectly formed smile, complete with dimples for eyes and a crease for the lips. Sarah Illenberger’s daily experience is a lot like that, only she’s been seeing rainbows, diamonds and disco balls in her food.
Sarah-Illenberger-Food-Art-2The Munich born, multi-disciplinary designer has made a name for herself by re-imagining familiar objects and creating witty new interpretations that broaden our perspectives. Her series Tutti Frutti began during a stroll through food markets in Tuscany, Italy. Wandering past the rows of colorful food, she grabbed fruit and vegetables, transforming them into everything from pome-grenades to Rubix-fruits – in each case creating something surprisingly clever, yet simple.
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In Seoul, Korea, a studio that measures 9 x 19 feet is much more incredible than its small size might lead you to believe.Here, Korean artist, Jee Young Lee transforms her studio into a new and enchanting world all of the time.
While traditional photography works to capture scenes you can find out in the real world, Lee Jee Young uses her imagination to create a scene worth photographing.After spending weeks, and sometimes even months, creating the perfect look, she stations herself creatively in the midst of the re-designed room before snapping a photo.
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Gergo1Hungarian photographer Gergő Gosztom is not a fan of the Christmas tree. Although I’m not sure of his feelings towards the holiday itself, Gosztom feels the Christmas tree is a huge waste: “I’ve always hated Christmas trees. It’s an unnecessary thing. We always thrown them away.” Gosztom took his dislike of the tradition and made it the subject of one of his series entitled “After Christmas” showing illuminated Christmas trees in various states of refuse. For more of his work you can visit GosztomGergo.hu
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29Tübingen - Germany (by Heribert Pohl)Tübingen  is a traditional university town in central Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is situated 30 km  south of the state capital, Stuttgart, on a ridge between the Neckar and Ammer rivers. As of 2014 about one in three people living in Tübingen is a student.

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SOE-1-mdIn photographer Susan Dobson’s series Sense of an Ending, she taps into our fascination of abandoned buildings. The once majestic-looking structures now sit among ruins and overgrown vegetation, and these haunting images remind us that everything built will eventually turn to dust. Dobson often frames her compositions so the homes look tiny when compared to a large, ominous-looking sky.
SOE-2-mdThe photographer’s intention was that these works were timeless. They could point to a post apocalyptic future or relics of the past. In a short statement about her work, Dobson explains:
„I am interested in how photographs have the ability to sit outside of any definitive time period, and to feel dislocated in time. It allows for associations to be made with a range of historical periods. For me, the series evokes images I have in my mind of the ruins from WWII that were still evident in Germany when I lived there as a child.”SOE-3-bg

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1In 2011, a man named Ben Nunery lost his wife Ali to lung cancer. She was only 31 years-old and together they had a 1 year-old girl. For the past two years, Ben and his daughter have had to overcome some emotional hurdles most of us couldn’t dream of enduring. As he and Olivia healed, the house they lived in became less of a painful reminder of what they lost.The house, bought as a fixer-upper before their wedding, was where this young couple started their life. They designed every nook and cranny and spent wonderful years there. Now, Ben and Olivia are packing up and moving on with their lives, but before they did, Ben decided to do something so beautiful…..
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